ALABAMA STATE CAPITOL BELL TO RING FOR NATIONAL COMMEMORATION

08/22/19

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Andi Martin, Marketing and Public Relations Manager  

andi.martin@ahc.alabama.gov, 334-230-2680

 

August 23, 2019

Alabama State Capitol Bell to Ring 

for National Commemoration

 

(Montgomery, AL) On Sunday, August 25, 2019 at 2:00 pm CST, the bell at the Alabama State Capitol will ring in solidarity with others across the country in a national “Day of Healing.”

 Across the nation, communities and organizations are hosting commemorative “Day of Healing” events recognizing the 400 years since the first arrival of enslaved Africans to colonial Jamestown, Virginia.

“This is a special moment in American history,” said National Park Service Superintendent Terry E. Brown of Fort Monroe. “Let’s unite as one on this day and show our appreciation for 400 years of African American history. We must embrace the West African concept of Sankofa, which teaches us that we must go back to our roots in order to move forward.”

 Though remembrances across the country will showcase unique elements, there is an important unifying component for all – a nationwide bellringing. To honor enslaved African ancestors and their descendants whose forced labor contributed to the establishment of the United Sates, bells will ring across the nation beginning at 3:00pm eastern for four minutes representing four hundred years. Organizers across the country are encouraging municipalities, townships, churches, schools, and individuals to participate in this powerful moment of remembrance by ringing bells in their respective time zones and locations.

 August 20, 2019 marked 400 years since the first enslaved Africans were forcibly migrated to Point Comfort in colonial Virginia. The White Lion, an English ship, reported “20 and odd” individuals were sold in exchange for food with the remaining transported to Jamestown and sold into slavery. These enslaved persons were the workforce behind the establishment of the first permanent English colony in North America.

 The Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project release stated, “The landing of enslaved Africans at Point Comfort and the various Middle Passage locations was a link in a chain of profound events that shaped the United States, yet this history is not widely known or appreciated. Commemorating that history honors the lives of these African people and their descendants, acknowledges their sacrifices, determination, and contributions, and encourages a re-shaping of the history with a more honest and inclusive telling of the story that will continue to unfold and inform.”

 

The Alabama State Capitol is a historic property of the Alabama Historical Commission and one of 14 other sites managed by the agency.  Executive Director of the Alabama Historical Commission, Lisa D. Jones said, “We are proud participate in the national commemoration and Day of Healing event, honoring ancestors and descendants of those who were enslaved in this country. This is an important day of reverence and remembrance.”

 For more than 150 years, the Alabama State Capitol has overlooked downtown Montgomery, AL from its pinnacle setting. This National Historic Landmark is a working museum of state history and politics.

The Alabama State Capitol is now recognized as an official destination on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail along with more than 100 locations across 14 states.

 The Alabama State Capitol is a historic property of the Alabama Historical Commission. To learn more about the Alabama Historical Commission, or Alabama State Capitol, please visit www.ahc.alabama.gov.

 About the Alabama Historical Commission

Located in historic downtown Montgomery at 468 S. Perry Street, the Alabama Historical Commission is the state historic preservation agency for Alabama. The agency was created by an act of the state legislature in 1966 with a mission to protect, preserve and interpret Alabama’s historic places. AHC works to accomplish its mission through two fields of endeavor: Preservation and promotion of state-owned historic sites as public attractions; and, statewide programs to assist people, groups, towns, and cities with local preservation activities. For a complete list of programs and properties owned and operated by the AHC, hours of operation, and admission fees please visit ahc.alabama.gov.

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